Learning Centre

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Wentworth Advantage believes that learning is a life-long pursuit. To help you, we’ve collected a selection of current, thought-provoking articles,
covering our five core competencies for Building Better Businesses:

  • People Management
  • Employment Legal Compliance
  • Business Management
  • Strategy
  • Governance
Last updated on:
18-Aug-2011 05:10 AM
Branding in the Digital Age
Consumers today connect with brands in fundamentally new ways, often through media channels that are beyond manufacturers' and retailers' control. That means traditional marketing strategies must be redesigned to accord with how brand relationships have changed.Reference: Harvard Business Review, December 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 12, p 62 – 69

First Published: 18-Aug-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:28 PM
Extreme Negotiations
The authors outline five core strategies that "in extremis" military negotiators use to resolve conflicts and influence others: maintaining a big-picture perspective; uncovering hidden agendas; building trust; and focusing on process as well as outcomes. These strategies provide an effective framework that business executives can use to prepare for a negotiation and guide their moves at the bargaining table. Reference: Harvard Business Review, November 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 11, p 66 – 75

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:33 PM
Four Lessons in Adaptive Leadership
The armed services have been in the business of leadership development much longer than the corporate world has. Today's military leaders need tools and techniques to face a fast-changing and unpredictable type of enemy--so the armed services train their officers in ways that build a culture of readiness and commitment. Four lessons are featured in the article. Reference: Harvard Business Review, November 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 11, p 86 - 90

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:35 PM
Reputation Warfare
Companies today increasingly find themselves under attack from dissatisfied customers, disgruntled employees, and just about anyone who has a personal computer and an axe to grind. Blogs, tweets, text messages, online petitions, Facebook protest sites, and digital videos all represent potent new threats, and companies need to learn how to respond. Reference: Harvard Business Review, December 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 12, p 70 - 76

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:36 PM
Sowing the Seeds for Growth
With the economy on the up, it’s time to start branching out again. This article provides some pointers on how SMEs can start repositioning themselves for growth. Reference: Company Director, May 2010, p 34 – 38

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:38 PM
The Emerging Capital Market for Non-profits
The article focuses on non-profit organisation finance and management. Research on why new non-profit organisations seldom achieve the growth rates of comparable new business enterprises is discussed that suggests that the system which transmits information and investment between donors and the non-profit organisations are flawed because they fail to provide reliable evaluation of the organisation's performance. Reference: Harvard Business Review, October 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 10, p 110 – 118

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:39 PM
The Truths about IT Costs
The article focuses on cost control in information-technology budgets when overspending results from seven situations. Solutions and preventive measures are mentioned for situations where application enhancements are not cost effective, projects are complicated with unnecessary functionality, technology investments are underutilized, teams lack incentive and quality is not measured, and project failure rates are high. Reference: Harvard Business Review, March 2009, Vol. 87 Issue 3, p 28

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:41 PM
Unleashing the Power of Marketing
The article examines marketing management at General Electric Co. (GE). The transformation of the company's marketing department into an integral part of product development, product management and strategic planning after years of relative neglect is considered. Reference: Harvard Business Review, October 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 10, p 90 – 98

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:42 PM
Why Succession Shouldn't be a Horse Race
From the moment Mulcahy stepped into her job as CEO, in 2001, the Xerox board of directors began discussing who would succeed her. Looking back on the long process of choosing and grooming her successor, she acknowledges the wisdom of having started that conversation a lot earlier than might have felt comfortable. Reference: Harvard Business Review, October 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 10, p 47 - 51

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:53 PM
As The War Heats Up
The global financial crisis provided a brief respite in the war for talent. This article investigates how boards can assist as conditions on ‘the battlefield’ heat up again. Reference: Company Director, February 2010, p 50 – 52

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:54 PM
Balancing the Director Liability Burden
As society reappraises the risks posed by limited liability corporations, this article stresses the importance of balancing the liability burden faced by directors Reference: Company Director, February 2010, p 42 – 45

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:55 PM
Directorships in Cyberspace
Directors have much to gain by using new technologies, but as this article reports, they also need to be aware of the many risks. Reference: Company Director, September 2010, p 32 – 35

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:56 PM
Double Trouble
Do good things come in pairs? This article investigates whether a two-tiered board would be better clarify directors’ roles and responsibilities and help close the “expectation gap”. Reference: Company Director, August 2010, p 28 – 31

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:57 PM
Six Ways Companies Mismanage Risk
To manage risk effectively, you have to choose the right data and metrics and have a clear sense of how all the moving parts work together. This article looks at the six fundamental mistakes that Directors and Risk Managers routinely make. Reference: Harvard Business Review, March 2009, Vol. 87 Issue 3, p 86 – 94

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:59 PM
The Case for Professional Boards
When the world's largest financial institutions had to be rescued from insolvency in 2008, many experts laid the blame at the feet of corporate boards. In this article, the author presents a new model for the corporate board. Reference: Harvard Business Review, December 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 12, p 50 - 58

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 06:00 PM
The Gender Imbalance
Research increasingly shows greater gender diversity can boost performance, yet women remain underrepresented on Australian boards. This article investigates why and what can be done. Reference: Company Director, June 2010, p 28 – 30

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 06:05 PM
When the CEO Isn’t up to Scratch
Boards need to target potential CEO underperformance well before bigger problems emerge. This article provides some tips on how to spot a CEO who isn’t up to scratch and what to do about it. Reference: Company Director, February 2010, p 16 – 19

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 06:06 PM
When the Chairman Underperforms
Chairman ineffectiveness can be the “elephant in the room” for some boards. This article investigates what boards can do about it. Reference: Company Director, July 2010, p 20 – 24

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
17-Aug-2011 07:04 PM
After Layoffs, Help Survivors Be More Effective
The article offers information concerning the social aspects of downsizing an organization and the management of employees who remain with a company after layoffs. Research indicates that employee dysfunction can reduce creativity, disrupt the flow of information across social networks, and increase stress and employee turnover. Reference: Harvard Business Review, June 2009, Vol. 87 Issue 6, p 15

First Published: 17-Aug-2011

Last updated on:
17-Aug-2011 09:59 PM
Competing on Talent Analytics
Do investments in your employees actually affect workforce performance? Who are your top performers? How can you empower and motivate other employees to excel? The authors present the six key ways in which companies track, analyse, and use data about their people-ranging from a simple baseline of metrics. Reference: Harvard Business Review, October 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 10, p 52 – 58

First Published: 17-Aug-2011

Last updated on:
17-Aug-2011 10:00 PM
How to be a Good Boss in a Bad Economy
Times are still tough for many companies. It’s no excuse for not focussing on your staff. This article helps you rethink your responsibilities as the boss. Reference: Harvard Business Review, June 2009, Vol. 87 Issue 6, p 42 - 50

First Published: 17-Aug-2011

Last updated on:
17-Aug-2011 10:01 PM
Myth of the Overqualified Worker
The article discusses the benefits of hiring workers deemed overqualified for the position under consideration. One study found that overqualified workers perform better than their brethren and are less likely to quit. A second study determined that job satisfaction on the part of overqualified employees could be overcome by giving them more autonomy. Reference: Harvard Business Review, December 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 12, p 30

First Published: 17-Aug-2011

Last updated on:
17-Aug-2011 10:01 PM
Rethinking Trust
Will we ever learn? We'd barely recovered from Enron and WorldCom before we faced the subprime mortgage meltdown and more scandals that shook our trust in businesspeople. Which raises the question: Do we trust too much? In this article, Stanford professor and social psychologist Kramer explores the reasons we trust so easily -- and, often, so unwisely. Reference: Harvard Business Review, June 2009, Vol. 87 Issue 6, p 68 – 77

First Published: 17-Aug-2011

Last updated on:
17-Aug-2011 10:02 PM
The Hidden Advantages of Quiet Bosses
The article discusses research that identified situations where introverts are more apt to be effective leaders than extroverts. Although it is generally accepted that extroverts make the best leaders, the authors found that introverts can be better in unpredictable, changing environments where workers are proactive about sharing their ideas. Reference: Harvard Business Review, December 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 12, p 28

First Published: 17-Aug-2011

Last updated on:
17-Aug-2011 10:03 PM
The Layoff
If Astrigo Holdings is to remain competitive, 10% of its workforce must be cut. Who goes, and who stays? Reference: Harvard Business Review, March 2009, Vol. 87 Issue 3, p 33 - 40

First Published: 17-Aug-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:15 PM
What's Needed Next: A Culture of Candour and Rebuilding Trust
We won’t be able to rebuild trust in the workplace until leaders learn how to communicate honestly and create organisations where that’s the norm. In this article, HBR puts a spotlight on Trust. Reference: Harvard Business Review, June 2009, Vol. 87 Issue 6, p 54 – 61

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:18 PM
Why You Didn't Get That Promotion
Promotions are often governed by unwritten rules. If you don't know what they are, you'll be left to your own devices interpreting vague feedback and finding a way to achieve your career goals. This article creates a framework to help you identify and address any issues that may be getting in your way. Reference: Harvard Business Review, June 2009, Vol. 87 Issue 6, p 101 – 105

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:47 PM
Innovation in Turbulent Times
When resources are constrained, the key to growth is pairing an analytic left-brain thinker with an imaginative right-brain partner. Reference: Harvard Business Review, June 2009, Vol. 87 Issue 6, p 79 - 86

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:49 PM
Stress Test Your Strategy
An economic downturn can quickly expose the shortcomings of your business strategy. But can you identify its weak points in good times as well? And can you focus on those weak points that really matter? This article identifies seven questions all executives should ask in order to ensure their strategies' success. Reference: Harvard Business Review, November 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 11, p 92 – 100

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:50 PM
Ten Fatal Flaws That Derail Leaders
The article refers to research using 360-degree feedback data on executives at Fortune 500 companies and mentions ten personality traits or behaviours that are found in ineffective leaders. The leadership flaws include acceptance of mediocre performance, lack of enthusiasm and interpersonal skills, poor judgment, failure to develop subordinates, and resistance to new ideas. Reference: Harvard Business Review, June 2009, Vol. 87 Issue 6, p 18

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

Last updated on:
16-Oct-2011 05:51 PM
What's Your Personal Social Media Strategy
Social media is changing the way we do business and how leaders are perceived, from the shop floor to the CEO suite. But whereas the best businesses are creating comprehensive strategies in this area, research suggests that few corporate leaders have a social media presence-say, a Facebook or LinkedIn page-and that those who do don't use it strategically. Reference: Harvard Business Review, November 2010, Vol. 88 Issue 11, p 127 - 130

First Published: 16-Oct-2011

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The material contained in the Learning Centre is general comment and is not intended as advice on any particular matter. No reader should act or fail to act on the basis of any material contained herein. The material contained in this section of the website should not be relied on as a substitute for legal or professional advice on any particular matter. Wentworth Advantage Pty Ltd, the editor and the authors expressly disclaim all and any liability to any persons whatsoever in respect of anything done or omitted to be done by any such person in reliance whether in whole or in part upon any of the contents of this section. Without limiting the generality of this disclaimer, no author or editor shall have any responsibility for any other author or editor.

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